NMC Library

Gods of war, gods of peace : how the meeting of native and colonial religions shaped early America / Russell Bourne.

By: Bourne, Russell
Publisher: New York : Harcourt, c2002Edition: 1st edDescription: xv, 425 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cmISBN: 015100501XSubject(s): United States -- Religion -- To 1800DDC classification: 200/.973/09033 LOC classification: BL2525 | .B685 2002
Contents:
1. The devilish interaction of two religions -- 2. A Wampanoag "saint" and a Narragannsett prince -- 3. Two men of opposed Gods on the northern frontier -- 4. The New England apostle's native churches -- 5. The early eighteenth century's flowering of hope -- 6. In the twilight of an empire, a mission-minded schoolmaster and a prophet for Pontiac -- 7. Prophets of two separate revolutions -- 8. The imminent apocalypse and the ultimate removal.
Summary: Publisher description: Through dramatic comparisons of Native American and early colonial politics, history, and religion, historian Russell Bourne offers a complete and insightful look at how these two disparate groups influenced each other and how this interchange helped forge the basis for the culture we live in today. Despite living in a war-torn world, both sides made heroic efforts to reach out to each other. The religious and cultural concepts of the Native Americans helped to transform the colonists, turning many into pantheists, communal villagers, and woodland warriors. Similarly, many of the Native Americans became evangelical Christians, farmers, traders, and even commanders of nationalistic armies. Benjamin Franklin, marveling at the cooperation and mutual respect evident among the Six Nations of the Iroquois, suggested that colonial leaders should follow their lead. Yet, in the end, differences and treacheries drove the two peoples apart. Based on extensive historical research and consultation with numerous Native American and academic sources, Gods of War, Gods of Peace offers a revelatory new view of how Native American and colonial religions shaped America and its ideals.
List(s) this item appears in: HST 211
Item type Current location Shelving location Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
Book Book NMC Library
Stacks BL2525 .B685 2002 (Browse shelf) 1 Available 33039000690585

Maps on lining papers.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [387]-398) and index.

1. The devilish interaction of two religions -- 2. A Wampanoag "saint" and a Narragannsett prince -- 3. Two men of opposed Gods on the northern frontier -- 4. The New England apostle's native churches -- 5. The early eighteenth century's flowering of hope -- 6. In the twilight of an empire, a mission-minded schoolmaster and a prophet for Pontiac -- 7. Prophets of two separate revolutions -- 8. The imminent apocalypse and the ultimate removal.

Publisher description: Through dramatic comparisons of Native American and early colonial politics, history, and religion, historian Russell Bourne offers a complete and insightful look at how these two disparate groups influenced each other and how this interchange helped forge the basis for the culture we live in today. Despite living in a war-torn world, both sides made heroic efforts to reach out to each other. The religious and cultural concepts of the Native Americans helped to transform the colonists, turning many into pantheists, communal villagers, and woodland warriors. Similarly, many of the Native Americans became evangelical Christians, farmers, traders, and even commanders of nationalistic armies. Benjamin Franklin, marveling at the cooperation and mutual respect evident among the Six Nations of the Iroquois, suggested that colonial leaders should follow their lead. Yet, in the end, differences and treacheries drove the two peoples apart. Based on extensive historical research and consultation with numerous Native American and academic sources, Gods of War, Gods of Peace offers a revelatory new view of how Native American and colonial religions shaped America and its ideals.

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