NMC Library

Know your price : valuing black lives and property in America's black cities / Andre M. Perry.

By: Perry, Andre MPublisher: Washington, D.C. : Brookings Institution Press, [2020]Description: xii, 251 pages ; 24 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780815737278; 0815737270Other title: Valuing black lives and property in America's black citiesSubject(s): Urban African Americans -- Economic conditions | Urban African Americans -- Social conditions | Valuation -- United States | United States -- Race relations | United States -- Social conditions -- 1945-Additional physical formats: Online version:: Know your price.LOC classification: E185.8 | .P43 2020
Contents:
Introduction: The asset of home -- Who runs the city -- A father forged in Detroit -- Buy back the block -- A different kind of school -- The apologies we owe to students and teachers -- Having babies like white people -- For the sake of America, elect a black woman president -- "This city will be chocolate at the end of the day."
Summary: "The deliberate devaluation of Blacks and their communities-stemming from America's centuries-old history of slavery, racism, and other state-sanctioned policies like redlining-have tangible, far-reaching, and negative economic and social impacts. Rejecting policies shaped by flawed perspectives, this book gives fresh insights on these impacts and provides a new value paradigm to limit them. Noted educator, journalist, and scholar Andre Perry takes readers on a guided tour of five Black-majority cities whose assets and strengths are undervalued. Perry begins the tour in his hometown of Wilkinsburg, a small city east of Pittsburgh that, unlike its much larger neighbor, is struggling and failing to attract new jobs and industry. Perry gives an overview of Black-majority cities and spotlights four that he has a deep connection to-Detroit, New Orleans, Birmingham, and Washington, D.C.-providing an intimate look at the assets residents should demand greater value from. The book demonstrates through rigorous research and analysis the worth of Black people's intrinsic strengths, real property, and traditional institutions. All of these assets are means of empowerment, as Perry argues for shifting away from simplified notions of equality and moving toward maximizing equity"-- Provided by publisher.
List(s) this item appears in: Antiracism
Item type Current library Shelving location Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
New Book New Book NMC Library
New Book Shelf E185.8 .P43 2020 (Browse shelf (Opens below)) 1 Available 33039001460897

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: The asset of home -- Who runs the city -- A father forged in Detroit -- Buy back the block -- A different kind of school -- The apologies we owe to students and teachers -- Having babies like white people -- For the sake of America, elect a black woman president -- "This city will be chocolate at the end of the day."

"The deliberate devaluation of Blacks and their communities-stemming from America's centuries-old history of slavery, racism, and other state-sanctioned policies like redlining-have tangible, far-reaching, and negative economic and social impacts. Rejecting policies shaped by flawed perspectives, this book gives fresh insights on these impacts and provides a new value paradigm to limit them. Noted educator, journalist, and scholar Andre Perry takes readers on a guided tour of five Black-majority cities whose assets and strengths are undervalued. Perry begins the tour in his hometown of Wilkinsburg, a small city east of Pittsburgh that, unlike its much larger neighbor, is struggling and failing to attract new jobs and industry. Perry gives an overview of Black-majority cities and spotlights four that he has a deep connection to-Detroit, New Orleans, Birmingham, and Washington, D.C.-providing an intimate look at the assets residents should demand greater value from. The book demonstrates through rigorous research and analysis the worth of Black people's intrinsic strengths, real property, and traditional institutions. All of these assets are means of empowerment, as Perry argues for shifting away from simplified notions of equality and moving toward maximizing equity"-- Provided by publisher.

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