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Honoring elders : aging, authority, and Ojibwe religion / Michael D. McNally.

By: McNally, Michael DavidSeries: Religion and American culture (New York, N.Y.)Publisher: New York : Columbia University Press, [2009]Description: 1 online resource (xxi, 382 pages) : illustrations, portraitsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780231518253; 0231518250; 1281728292; 9781281728296; 9786613789075; 6613789070; 0231145020; 9780231145022; 0231145039; 9780231145039Subject(s): Older Ojibwa Indians | Ojibwa Indians -- Religion | Ojibwa Indians -- Social life and customs | SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Ethnic Studies -- Native American Studies | RELIGION -- General | Ojibwa Indians -- Religion | Ojibwa Indians -- Social life and customs | Older Ojibwa IndiansGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Honoring elders.DDC classification: 305.897 LOC classification: E99.C6 | M346 2009Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Aging and the life cycle imagined in Ojibwe tradition and lived in history -- Eldership, respect, and the sacred community -- Elders as grandparents and teachers -- Elders articulating tradition -- The sacralization of eldership -- The shape of wisdom.
Summary: Like many Native Americans, Ojibwe people esteem the wisdom, authority, and religious significance of old age, but this respect does not come easily or naturally. It is the fruit of hard work, rooted in narrative traditions, moral vision, and ritualized practices of decorum that are comparable in sophistication to those of Confucianism. Even as the dispossession and policies of assimilation have threatened Ojibwe peoplehood and have targeted the traditions and the elders who embody it, Ojibwe and other Anishinaabe communities have been resolute and resourceful in their disciplined resp.
List(s) this item appears in: Indigenous Peoples
Item type Current library Collection Shelving location Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
Ebook Ebook NMC Library
JSTOR Online E99.C6 M346 2009 EBOOK (Browse shelf (Opens below)) 1 Available online - NMC Login required 483474

Includes bibliographical references (pages 355-364) and index.

Online resource; title from PDF title page (Jstor, viewed May 21, 2018).

Like many Native Americans, Ojibwe people esteem the wisdom, authority, and religious significance of old age, but this respect does not come easily or naturally. It is the fruit of hard work, rooted in narrative traditions, moral vision, and ritualized practices of decorum that are comparable in sophistication to those of Confucianism. Even as the dispossession and policies of assimilation have threatened Ojibwe peoplehood and have targeted the traditions and the elders who embody it, Ojibwe and other Anishinaabe communities have been resolute and resourceful in their disciplined resp.

Aging and the life cycle imagined in Ojibwe tradition and lived in history -- Eldership, respect, and the sacred community -- Elders as grandparents and teachers -- Elders articulating tradition -- The sacralization of eldership -- The shape of wisdom.

English.

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