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Grown-up anger : the connected mysteries of Bob Dylan, Woody Guthrie, and the Calumet massacre of 1913 / Daniel Wolff.

By: Wolff, Daniel J [author.].
Publisher: New York, NY : Harper, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, [2017]Copyright date: ©2017Edition: First edition.Description: 354 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780062451699; 9780062451705.Subject(s): Popular music -- Political aspects -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Folk music -- Political aspects -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Italian Hall Disaster, Calumet, Mich., 1913 | Dylan, Bob, 1941- | Guthrie, Woody, 1912-1967Additional physical formats: Online version:: Grown-up angerDDC classification: 782.42164092/2
Contents:
Once upon a time -- True stories about real events -- A little bad luck -- Some vision of the future -- Men possessed by anger -- No martyr is among ye now -- To handle men -- Till the world is level -- We are the bosses now -- The truth just twists -- Struggle -- Take a trip with me in 1913 -- How does it feel? -- Underground.
Summary: When thirteen-year-old Daniel Wolff first heard Bob Dylan's "Like a Rolling Stone," it ignited a life-long interest in understanding the rock poet's anger. When he later discovered "Song to Woody," Dylan's tribute to his hero, Woody Guthrie, Wolff believed he'd uncovered one source of Dylan's rage. Sifting through Guthrie's recordings, Wolff found "1913 Massacre"--A song which told the story of a union Christmas party during a strike in Calumet, Michigan, in 1913 that ended in horrific tragedy. Following the trail from Dylan to Guthrie to an event that claimed the lives of seventy-four men, women, and children a century ago, Wolff found himself tracing the history of an anger that has been passed down for decades. From America's early industrialized days, an epic battle to determine the country's direction has been waged, pitting bosses against workers and big business against the labor movement. In Guthrie's eyes, the owners ultimately won; the 1913 Michigan tragedy was just one example of a larger lost history purposely distorted and buried in time. In this cultural study, Wolff braids three disparate strands -- Calumet, Guthrie, and Dylan -- together to create a revisionist history of twentieth-century America. Grown-Up Anger chronicles the struggles between the haves and have-nots, the impact changing labor relations had on industrial America, and the way two musicians used their fury to illuminate economic injustice and inspire change.
List(s) this item appears in: Narrative Nonfiction
Item type Current location Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
Book Osterlin Library
Stacks
ML3917 .U6 W65 2017 (Browse shelf) 1 Available 33039001427524

Includes bibliographical references (pages 261-331) and index.

Once upon a time -- True stories about real events -- A little bad luck -- Some vision of the future -- Men possessed by anger -- No martyr is among ye now -- To handle men -- Till the world is level -- We are the bosses now -- The truth just twists -- Struggle -- Take a trip with me in 1913 -- How does it feel? -- Underground.

When thirteen-year-old Daniel Wolff first heard Bob Dylan's "Like a Rolling Stone," it ignited a life-long interest in understanding the rock poet's anger. When he later discovered "Song to Woody," Dylan's tribute to his hero, Woody Guthrie, Wolff believed he'd uncovered one source of Dylan's rage. Sifting through Guthrie's recordings, Wolff found "1913 Massacre"--A song which told the story of a union Christmas party during a strike in Calumet, Michigan, in 1913 that ended in horrific tragedy. Following the trail from Dylan to Guthrie to an event that claimed the lives of seventy-four men, women, and children a century ago, Wolff found himself tracing the history of an anger that has been passed down for decades. From America's early industrialized days, an epic battle to determine the country's direction has been waged, pitting bosses against workers and big business against the labor movement. In Guthrie's eyes, the owners ultimately won; the 1913 Michigan tragedy was just one example of a larger lost history purposely distorted and buried in time. In this cultural study, Wolff braids three disparate strands -- Calumet, Guthrie, and Dylan -- together to create a revisionist history of twentieth-century America. Grown-Up Anger chronicles the struggles between the haves and have-nots, the impact changing labor relations had on industrial America, and the way two musicians used their fury to illuminate economic injustice and inspire change.

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