NMC Library

Pieter Bruegel and the idea of human nature / Elizabeth Alice Honig.

By: Honig, Elizabeth ASeries: Renaissance livesPublisher: London, UK : Reaktion Books, 2019Copyright date: ©2019Description: 269 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 23 cmContent type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781789140767; 1789140765Contained works: Bruegel, Pieter, approximately 1525-1569. Works. SelectionsSubject(s): Bruegel, Pieter, approximately 1525-1569 -- Themes, motives | Painters -- Belgium -- 16th century -- Biography | Painting, Flemish | Painting, Renaissance | Humanity in artLOC classification: ND673 .B73 | H665 2019Summary: In sixteenth-century Northern Europe, during a time of increasing religious and political conflict, Flemish painter Pieter Bruegel explored how people perceived human nature. Bruegel turned his critical eye and peerless paintbrush to mankind's labors and pleasures, its foibles and rituals of daily life, portraying landscapes, peasant life, and biblical scenes in startling detail. Much like the great humanist scholar Erasmus of Rotterdam, Bruegel questioned how well we really know ourselves and also how we know, or visually read, others. His work often represented mankind's ignorance and insignificance, emphasizing the futility of ambition and the absurdity of pride. This superbly illustrated volume examines how Bruegel's art and ideas enabled people to ponder what it meant to be human. Published to coincide with the four-hundred-fiftieth anniversary of Bruegel's death, it will appeal to all those interested in art and philosophy, the Renaissance, and Flemish painting.
Item type Current library Shelving location Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
Book Book NMC Library
Stacks ND673 .B73 H665 2019 (Browse shelf (Opens below)) 1 Available 33039001486751

Includes bibliographical references (pages 246-259) and index.

In sixteenth-century Northern Europe, during a time of increasing religious and political conflict, Flemish painter Pieter Bruegel explored how people perceived human nature. Bruegel turned his critical eye and peerless paintbrush to mankind's labors and pleasures, its foibles and rituals of daily life, portraying landscapes, peasant life, and biblical scenes in startling detail. Much like the great humanist scholar Erasmus of Rotterdam, Bruegel questioned how well we really know ourselves and also how we know, or visually read, others. His work often represented mankind's ignorance and insignificance, emphasizing the futility of ambition and the absurdity of pride. This superbly illustrated volume examines how Bruegel's art and ideas enabled people to ponder what it meant to be human. Published to coincide with the four-hundred-fiftieth anniversary of Bruegel's death, it will appeal to all those interested in art and philosophy, the Renaissance, and Flemish painting.

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