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Chi-mewinzha : Ojibwe stories from Leech Lake / Dorothy Dora Whipple, Mezinaashiikwe ; edited by Wendy Makoons Geniusz and Brendan Fairbanks ; illustrations by Annmarie Geniusz.

By: Whipple, Dorothy Dora, 1919- [author.].
Contributor(s): Geniusz, Wendy Djinn [editor.] | Fairbanks, Brendan [editor.] | Geniusz, Annmarie Fay [illustrator.].
Publisher: Minneapolis ; London : University of Minnesota Press, [2015]Copyright date: �2015Description: 1 online resource (xvi, 124 pages) : illustrations, portraits.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781452944661; 1452944660; 9781452944678; 1452944679.Other title: Ojibwe stories from Leech Lake.Subject(s): Whipple, Dorothy Dora, 1919- | Whipple, Dorothy Dora, 1919- | Ojibwa Indians -- Folklore | Ojibwa Indians -- History | Ojibwa Indians -- Social life and customs | Leech Lake Indian Reservation (Minn.) -- Folklore | Leech Lake Indian Reservation (Minn.) -- Social life and customs | Ojibwa language -- Texts | FICTION -- Fairy Tales, Folk Tales, Legends & Mythology | SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Ethnic Studies -- Native American Studies | Manners and customs | Ojibwa Indians | Ojibwa Indians -- Social life and customs | Ojibwa language | Minnesota -- Leech Lake Indian ReservationGenre/Form: Electronic books. | Folklore. | History. | Texts.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Chi-mewinzhaDDC classification: 398.2089/97333 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Introduction -- Editors' Remarks -- Ogii-waabamaawaan Chi-ozagaskwaajimen -- "They Saw a Big Leech" -- Bagijigeyan Asemaa -- "When You Make a Tobacco Offering" -- Ziigwan, Niibin, Dagwaagin, Biboon -- "Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter" (Version 1) -- Ziigwan, Niibin, Dagwaagin, Biboon -- "Spring Summer, Fall, Winter" (Version 2) -- Iskigamizigeng -- "Boiling Sap" -- Ji-bagijiged O-miigaazod -- "To Make an Offering When He Goes to War" -- Agoodweiwin -- "Snaring" -- Gii-pi-bajiishka'ondwaa -- "When They Came to Give Them Shots" -- Gii-twaashin Mikwamiing -- "He Fell through the Ice" -- Shut Up! -- "Shut Up!" -- Bagida'waang Zaaga'iganiing -- "Fishing with a Net on a Lake" -- Wii-maji-doodawaad Awiiya A'aw Gookooko'oo -- "When the Owl Treated Someone Bad" -- Agoodweng Waaboozoon -- "Snaring a Rabbit" -- Manoominike-zaaga'igan -- Rice Lake -- Gii-maazhendam Gii-nanawizid -- "He Was Upset When He Was Empty-Handed" -- Ogii-miigaadaanaawaa I'iw Waazakonenjigan Imaa Atood Miinawaa Iw aazhogan -- "They Fought to Have That Stoplight and Bridge Put In" -- Imbiindaakoojige Imaa Asiniing -- "I Made an Offering There on the Rock" -- Makwa Ingii-pimaaji'ig -- "Bear Saved My Life" -- Notes on Orthography -- Transcription Notes -- Glossary.
Summary: In the first ninety-five years of her life, Dorothy Dora Whipple has seen a lot of history, and in this book that history, along with the endangered Ojibwe language, sees new life. A bilingual record of Dorothy's stories, ranging from personal history to cultural teachings, Chi-mewinzha (long ago) presents this venerable elder's words in the original Ojibwe, painstakingly transcribed, and in English translation to create an invaluable resource for learning this cherished language. The events of Dorothy Dora Whipple's life resonate with Ojibwe life and culture through the twentieth century, from tales of growing up among the Anishinaabeg of the Leech Lake Reservation in the 1920s and 1930s to an account of watching an American Indian Movement protest in Minneapolis during the 1970s. In between, we encounter modern dilemmas (like trying to find a place to make a tobacco offering in an airport) and traditional stories (such as the gigantic beings who were seen in the water chi-mewinzha). Dorothy's own recollections--sometimes amusing, sometimes poignant--offer insight into the daily realities, both intimate and emblematic, of Native American life. Dorothy remembers an older sister coming home from boarding school, no longer speaking Ojibwe--and no longer able to communicate with her siblings. This collection resists such a fate, sharing the language so critical to a people's identity and offering a key text to those who would learn, preserve, and speak Ojibwe.
Item type Current location Collection Shelving location Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
Ebook Ebook Osterlin Library
JSTOR-PMT Online E99.C6 W47 2015 EBOOK (Browse shelf) 1 Available online - NMC Login required 2018-263411
Ebook Ebook Osterlin Library
Ebook Central Online E99.C6 .W457 2015 EBOOK (Browse shelf) 1 Available online - NMC Login required 2018-219551

Text in English and in Ojibwa.

Includes bibliographical references.

Print version record.

In the first ninety-five years of her life, Dorothy Dora Whipple has seen a lot of history, and in this book that history, along with the endangered Ojibwe language, sees new life. A bilingual record of Dorothy's stories, ranging from personal history to cultural teachings, Chi-mewinzha (long ago) presents this venerable elder's words in the original Ojibwe, painstakingly transcribed, and in English translation to create an invaluable resource for learning this cherished language. The events of Dorothy Dora Whipple's life resonate with Ojibwe life and culture through the twentieth century, from tales of growing up among the Anishinaabeg of the Leech Lake Reservation in the 1920s and 1930s to an account of watching an American Indian Movement protest in Minneapolis during the 1970s. In between, we encounter modern dilemmas (like trying to find a place to make a tobacco offering in an airport) and traditional stories (such as the gigantic beings who were seen in the water chi-mewinzha). Dorothy's own recollections--sometimes amusing, sometimes poignant--offer insight into the daily realities, both intimate and emblematic, of Native American life. Dorothy remembers an older sister coming home from boarding school, no longer speaking Ojibwe--and no longer able to communicate with her siblings. This collection resists such a fate, sharing the language so critical to a people's identity and offering a key text to those who would learn, preserve, and speak Ojibwe.

Introduction -- Editors' Remarks -- Ogii-waabamaawaan Chi-ozagaskwaajimen -- "They Saw a Big Leech" -- Bagijigeyan Asemaa -- "When You Make a Tobacco Offering" -- Ziigwan, Niibin, Dagwaagin, Biboon -- "Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter" (Version 1) -- Ziigwan, Niibin, Dagwaagin, Biboon -- "Spring Summer, Fall, Winter" (Version 2) -- Iskigamizigeng -- "Boiling Sap" -- Ji-bagijiged O-miigaazod -- "To Make an Offering When He Goes to War" -- Agoodweiwin -- "Snaring" -- Gii-pi-bajiishka'ondwaa -- "When They Came to Give Them Shots" -- Gii-twaashin Mikwamiing -- "He Fell through the Ice" -- Shut Up! -- "Shut Up!" -- Bagida'waang Zaaga'iganiing -- "Fishing with a Net on a Lake" -- Wii-maji-doodawaad Awiiya A'aw Gookooko'oo -- "When the Owl Treated Someone Bad" -- Agoodweng Waaboozoon -- "Snaring a Rabbit" -- Manoominike-zaaga'igan -- Rice Lake -- Gii-maazhendam Gii-nanawizid -- "He Was Upset When He Was Empty-Handed" -- Ogii-miigaadaanaawaa I'iw Waazakonenjigan Imaa Atood Miinawaa Iw aazhogan -- "They Fought to Have That Stoplight and Bridge Put In" -- Imbiindaakoojige Imaa Asiniing -- "I Made an Offering There on the Rock" -- Makwa Ingii-pimaaji'ig -- "Bear Saved My Life" -- Notes on Orthography -- Transcription Notes -- Glossary.

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