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The fall of Gondolin / by J.R.R. Tolkien ; edited by Christopher Tolkien ; with illustrations by Alan Lee.

By: Tolkien, J. R. R. (John Ronald Reuel), 1892-1973
Contributor(s): Tolkien, Christopher | Lee, Alan
Publisher: Boston : Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2018Copyright date: ©2018Edition: First U.S. editionDescription: 302 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, map, genealogical tables ; 22 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781328613042 (hardback); 1328613046 (hardback)Subject(s): FICTION / Fantasy / Epic | FICTION / Fairy Tales, Folk Tales, Legends & Mythology | Middle Earth (Imaginary place) -- Fiction | Elves -- FictionGenre/Form: Fantasy fiction.DDC classification: 823/.912 LOC classification: PR6039.O32 | F354 2018
Contents:
Prologue -- The original tale -- The earliest text -- Turlin and the exiles of Gondolin -- The story told in the Sketch of the Mythology -- The story told in the Quenta Noldorinwa -- The last version -- The evolution of the story -- Conclusion.
Summary: There are two of the great powers in the world. There is Morgoth of the uttermost evil, unseen in this story but ruling over a vast military power from his fortress of Angband. Deeply opposed to Morgoth is Ulmo, second in might only to Manwë, chief of the Valar: he is called the Lord of Waters, of all seas, lakes, and rivers under the sky. He works in secret in Middle-earth to support the Noldor, the kindred of the Elves among whom were numbered Húrin and Túrin Turambar. Central to this enmity of the gods is the city of Gondolin, beautiful but undiscoverable. It was built and peopled by Noldorin Elves who, when they dwelt in Valinor, the land of the gods, rebelled against their rule and fled to Middle-earth. Turgon King of Gondolin is hated and feared above all his enemies by Morgoth, who seeks in vain to discover the marvellously hidden city, while the gods in Valinor in heated debate largely refuse to intervene in support of Ulmo{u2019}s desires and designs. Into this world comes Tuor, cousin of Túrin, the instrument of Ulmo{u2019}s designs. Guided unseen by him Tuor sets out from the land of his birth on the fearful journey to Gondolin, and in one of the most arresting moments in the history of Middle-earth the sea-god himself appears to him, rising out of the ocean in the midst of a storm. In Gondolin he becomes great; he is wedded to Idril, Turgon{u2019}s daughter, and their son is Eärendel, whose birth and profound importance in days to come is foreseen by Ulmo. Morgoth learns through an act of supreme treachery that he needs to mount a devastating attack on the city, with Balrogs and dragons and numberless Orcs. After a minutely observed account of the fall of Gondolin, the tale ends with the escape of Túrin and Idril, with the child Eärendel, looking back from a cleft in the mountains as they flee southward, at the blazing wreckage of their city. They were journeying into a new story, the Tale of Eärendel, which Tolkien never wrote, but which is sketched out in this book from other sources.
Item type Current location Shelving location Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
Book Book Osterlin Library
Stacks PR6039.O32 F354 2018 (Browse shelf) 1 Available 33039001447191

Prologue -- The original tale -- The earliest text -- Turlin and the exiles of Gondolin -- The story told in the Sketch of the Mythology -- The story told in the Quenta Noldorinwa -- The last version -- The evolution of the story -- Conclusion.

There are two of the great powers in the world. There is Morgoth of the uttermost evil, unseen in this story but ruling over a vast military power from his fortress of Angband. Deeply opposed to Morgoth is Ulmo, second in might only to Manwë, chief of the Valar: he is called the Lord of Waters, of all seas, lakes, and rivers under the sky. He works in secret in Middle-earth to support the Noldor, the kindred of the Elves among whom were numbered Húrin and Túrin Turambar. Central to this enmity of the gods is the city of Gondolin, beautiful but undiscoverable. It was built and peopled by Noldorin Elves who, when they dwelt in Valinor, the land of the gods, rebelled against their rule and fled to Middle-earth. Turgon King of Gondolin is hated and feared above all his enemies by Morgoth, who seeks in vain to discover the marvellously hidden city, while the gods in Valinor in heated debate largely refuse to intervene in support of Ulmo{u2019}s desires and designs. Into this world comes Tuor, cousin of Túrin, the instrument of Ulmo{u2019}s designs. Guided unseen by him Tuor sets out from the land of his birth on the fearful journey to Gondolin, and in one of the most arresting moments in the history of Middle-earth the sea-god himself appears to him, rising out of the ocean in the midst of a storm. In Gondolin he becomes great; he is wedded to Idril, Turgon{u2019}s daughter, and their son is Eärendel, whose birth and profound importance in days to come is foreseen by Ulmo. Morgoth learns through an act of supreme treachery that he needs to mount a devastating attack on the city, with Balrogs and dragons and numberless Orcs. After a minutely observed account of the fall of Gondolin, the tale ends with the escape of Túrin and Idril, with the child Eärendel, looking back from a cleft in the mountains as they flee southward, at the blazing wreckage of their city. They were journeying into a new story, the Tale of Eärendel, which Tolkien never wrote, but which is sketched out in this book from other sources.

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